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“Important observations on the June-July meetings and their implications”

Dear Dr Ibrahim,

          To start with I would like to congratulate you on your successful web site. A site that has become a platform for Libyans and others to explore. Acknowledging this fact, I have some comments on the meetings that took place with the Libyan commission, which I would like to publish.

          As we all know the last few weeks saw a heated dispute over the meetings that took place between some Libyans living in the US and the Libyan ambassador to the UN and his commission. Without any doubt a mistake was made by the Libyans who took part in these talks. By suggesting that a mistake was made, this does not indicate that talking is not an option in this stage. However, there is ways of conducting talks that could bring mutual benefits to all Libyans. But before speaking about a dialogue with the Libyan government I want to indicate some facts.

          First of all it is quite surprising to me to read some suggestions indicating that the Libyan ambassador’s initiative is purely his. It is well known that no Libyan ambassador or official can conduct an action of this kind without the approval of Qaddafi and his very close circle. Moreover, the complicated Libyan regime and Qaddafi’s personality will never change or accept a dialogue that will change Libya to the better. Hence, the notions that suggests that the Libyan regime is changing or is going to improve is a myth. So what is the real motive behind these meetings? I recommend here without reservation that it seems that the Libyan regime is attempting to see to what extent the Libyans living abroad are united. Qaddafi is trying to use that same method his regime is using inside Libya. To clarify this point, the so called “No” or “LA” magazine published in Libya, a magazine that assumes the responsibility to fight and highlight corruption and wrong doing inside the private and public sectors. I shall be sorry indeed to say that this led to people spying and distorting each other inside the country. Thus, the majority of the Libyan people were engulfed in a hate process without looking for the real cause of the crisis in Libya.

          In the same context, Qaddafi is trying to control the Libyans living abroad in the proposed committees’ plan. We all know that at present Qaddafi and his regime is stronger than ever following the regime steady integration in the international community. However, the Libyans living abroad are still an element regarded as a threat to Qaddafi’s security. The solution in some stages was to kill them; a phenomena which reached its highest point in the 1980s. But this method can no longer be an option in the 1990s. Hence, further dividing the Libyans abroad seems to be a better method. Indeed, what the Libyan regime seems to be doing is playing a game among the Libyans abroad. In fact the impact of this new policy seems to be working very well as more fragmentation is currently taking place. A fragmentation that I feel very sorry to contemplate as we are the last resort to stop Qaddafi and his regime from holding to power.

          My fellow exiled Libyans, we should not sign up in any talks with this regime unless we are united. I therefore suggest that all Libyan opposition groups abroad form a united democratic alliance, if engaging in a dialogue. A dialogue that will secure the interest and the well being of all the Libyans inside and outside Libya. Some might argue that forming such an alliance is a very optimistic suggestion, but it is the only recommendation on hand. I am very sure that opposition groups will find a way and show us all how helpful and responsible they are in this important stage of our history.

Long Live Libya.

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